/en/aboutus/marineunit.asp Marine Unit - Peel Regional Police

Marine Unit

The Marine Unit was established in 1974. The unit operated a 16 foot aluminum boat inherited from the Port Credit Police Force. Operations were limited to patrolling the Credit River between the Queen Elizabeth Highway and Lake Ontario. Today, the Marine Unit is responsible for patrolling 170 square kilometers of Lake Ontario, including the Credit River and all bodies of water within the Region of Peel

The mandate of the Marine Unit is to respond to distress calls originating from vessels, aircraft and persons on Lake Ontario. Enforcement and boater education are additional responsibilities. The unit works closely with the Canadian Coast Guard and several other Canadian and American law-enforcement agencies as well as providing assistance, by way of transportation, to the Trillium Gift of Life (organ donor program).

The Peel Regional Police Marine Unit is located at 135 Lakefront Promenade in the City of Mississauga and can be contacted at 905-453-3311 extension #4799.

Marine 1 on waterMarine 1

Vessel Specifications  

  • A $500,000.00 vessel built by HIKE METAL, 40' in length, weighs over 12 tonnes requiring a Masters Certificate to operate.
  • It is powered by twin VOLVO-PENTA diesel engines both with dual counter rotating propellers.
  • It is equipped for extended all weather operation and has full decontamination facilities and is custom adapted for Diving Operations by the Underwater Search & Recovery Unit.
  • The vessel has built in fire suppression/fighting capabilities as-well as vessel towing equipment.

marine 2 on waterMarine 2

Vessel Specifications  

  • Operational in 2004, the Zodiac Hurricane, 7.5 meter Rigid Hull Inflatable Boat, operates Twin Yamaha outboard engines allowing for heavy sea state operations and fast response.
  • Electronics include: Electronic Navigation Systems, Police Electronics, Crew Communications System.

white SUV launching marine 3 into waterMarine 3

Vessel Specifications  

  • 18 foot flat bottom vessel powered by a 25hp outboard.
  • Trailer-able in order to respond to inland bodies of water

The Mandate of the Marine Unit

  • Saving and protecting lives and property.
  • Search and Rescue duties in conjunctions with other government agencies.
  • The enforcement of laws: Criminal Code, Provincial Offences Act, Canada Shipping Act, Small Vessel Regulations and Marine Collision Regulations.
  • The promotion of water safety through education and presentations.
  • Policing and Rescue in the Marine Environment, waterfront parks, rivers, frozen lakes and ponds, within the jurisdictional boundaries of the Region of Peel.

Responsibilities of the Marine Unit

Patrolling

Marine Unit is responsible for patrolling a 170 square kilometre section of Lake Ontario. This area is bordered by Marie Curtis Park (Etobicoke Creek) to the east (extending 26 Km south) and Joshua Creek on the west (extending 16 km south).

Search and Rescue

The Marine Unit is responsible for assisting in the co-ordinated search for any lost or overdue vessels. These operations are carried out with the co-operation of neighbouring policing agencies and the Canadian Coast Guard.

Marine Safety

Competency of Operators of Pleasure Craft Regulations

If you drive a boat, you are required by law to have a Pleasure Craft Operator Card.

Rules of the Road

The Competency of Operators of Pleasure Craft Regulations require operators of pleasure craft fitted with a motor and used for recreational purposes to have proof of competency on board at all times. These requirements are being phased in over ten years.

Operator Competency Requirements

How this applies to operators1 of pleasure craft fitted with motor and used for recreational purposes

Date at which proof of competency required on board

All operators born after April 1, 1983

September 15, 1999

All operators of craft under 4 metres in length, including personal watercraft

September 15, 2002

All operators

September 15, 2009

  1. Applies to non-residents operating their pleasure craft in Canadian waters after 45 consecutive days. Operator card or equivalent issued to a non-resident by their state or country will be considered as proof of competency.

Proof of competency can take 1 of 3 forms:

  1. Proof of having taken a boating safety course prior to April 1, 1999;
  2. A pleasure craft operator card from a Canadian Coast Guard accredited course provider following a test;
  3. A completed rental-boat safety checklist (for power-driven rental boats).

The operator card is good-for-life. Boaters can obtain their card after receiving a mark of at least 75% on a Canadian Coast Guard accredited test after having completed an accredited course. Boaters also have the option of taking this test without first completing a course. Professional mariners will see their qualification recognized.

Certificates for boating safety course completed before April 1, 1999 will be recognized. If you've already taken a course prior to these regulations and have proof - then that course certificate or card will be accepted as proof of competency! If you have a certificate, but want to obtain a more convenient form of on-the-water proof, the Canadian Coast Guard is working on ways to accommodate this.

Check the Coast Guard web site at http://www.ccg-gcc.gc.ca/ or call the Boating Safety Info-line at 1-800-267-6687 for news.

Buoy Basics

The Canadian Aids to Navigation System

buoy navigation looks like Y with green and red markings

Port (green can)

Keep this buoy on your port (left) side when proceeding in the upstream direction.

Bifurcation (red and green bands)

You may pass this buoy on either side when proceeding in the upstream direction, but the main or preferred channel is indicated by the colour of the topmost band. For example: Keep this buoy on your starboard (right) side.

Port (green pillar)

Keep this buoy on your port (left) side when proceeding in the upstream direction.

Port (green spar)

Keep this buoy on your port (left) side when proceeding in the upstream direction.

Starboard (red spar)

Keep this buoy on your starboard (right) side when proceeding in the upstream direction.

Starboard (red conical)

Keep this buoy on your starboard (right) side when proceeding in the upstream direction.

Starboard (red pillar)

Keep this buoy on your starboard (right) side when proceeding in the upstream direction.

buoy navigation for fairway

Fairway

This buoy indicates safe water, used to mark landfalls, channel entrances or channel centers. It may be passed on either side but should be kept to the port (left) side when proceeding in either direction

Isolated Danger

An isolated Danger Buoy is moored on, or above, an isolated danger which has navigable water all around it. Consult the chart for information concerning the danger, (dimensions, depth, etc.) May be used to mark natural dangers such as small shoals or obstructions such as wrecks.

Rules of the Road

The laws governing safe enjoyment of Canadian waters

The rules of the road are established by the Collision Regulations and apply to every vessel in all navigable waters - from canoe to super-tanker.

Maintaining a proper look-out and avoiding a collision

The Collision Regulations require the operator of every vessel to maintain a constant look-out. When operating in the vicinity of large commercial vessels, remember that these vessels have limited visibility, turning and stopping capabilities, so it is important to maintain an all-around lookout at all times and to be prepared to move out of the way of larger vessels. You are required to use every available means, including radar and radio (if so equipped), to determine whether there is any risk of collision with another vessel. That's not only common sense, it's the law!

Clear right-of-way rules exist to help vessels using the same waterways to avoid colliding with one another. The rules are very specific, and you must learn them. For example, right-of-way rules for power-driven vessels include the following:

Operating Rules

circle with red port, green starboard, white stern

Port: If a power-driven vessel approaches within this sector, maintain your course and speed with caution.

Starboard: If any vessel approaches within this sector, keep out of its way (Note: This rule may not always apply if one or both vessels are sailboats.)

Stern: If any vessel approaches this sector, maintain your course and speed with caution.

2 boats coming towards each other with arrows to show where to go

A blows one blast and alters course to starboard.

B blows one blast and alters course to starboard

2 boats with arrows showing not to pass infront of each other

A keeps clear of and must avoid crossing ahead of B.

2 boats showing how to overtake

Any vessel overtaking another must keep clear.

4 boats, 2 coming each way showing how to keep clear

A keeps clear of B

C keeps clear of A and B

B keeps clear of D

D keeps clear of A and C

2 boats showing how power vessel to keep clear of sailing vessel

A power-driven vessel keeps clear of a sailing vessel.

2 sailing vessels with wind on different side

When each sailing vessel has the wind on a different side, the vessel that has the wind on its port (left) side shall keep out of the way of the other. In our illustration, A keeps clear of B. If a sailing vessel has the wind on its port side and the sailor cannot determine with certainty whether the other vessel has the wind on its port or starboard side, the first vessel must keep out of the way of the other.

2 sailing vessels with wind on same side

When both sailing vessels have the wind on the same side, the vessel to windward shall keep out of the way of the vessel to leeward. B keeps clear of A.

Note: The windward side is defined as the side opposite to that of which the mainsail is carried or, in the case of a square-rigged vessel, the side opposite to that on which the largest for-and-aft sail is carried.