/en/aboutus/chiefcatney.asp Chief Catney - Peel Regional Police

Chief Catney

Recognizing Our Finest

portrait of Chief Noel Catney

The Chief's administration has reflected a sincere commitment to addressing the critical issues of diversity within the Region of Peel and the unique policing challenges they represent. The Chief is committed to a philosophy of maintaining a high profile and visibility within the one hundred and sixteen cultural groups that exist within the Region of Peel and consistently attends numerous social and religious events.

1997 to 2005

Noel Catney was appointed Chief of Peel Regional Police on April 24, 1997, assuming his position following 27 years of distinguished service. He began his career with the Mississauga Police in 1970 and became a member of Peel Regional Police upon amalgamation, on January 1, 1974.

Chief Catney's career spans the entire history of Peel Regional Police. When the service was formed in 1974, he continued to serve as an investigator with #11 Division Detective Bureau. He subsequently moved to the Morality Bureau and was then transferred to the Homicide Bureau, where he was deployed for six and one half years.

On December 20, 1981, he was assigned to Intelligence Services Bureau as the Officer in Charge. During this tenure of his career, the Chief was responsible for the services' activities with respect to the proliferation of organized crime, particularly with respect to successful resolution of numerous major criminal investigations.

Subsequently, he was promoted to Staff Inspector, and in 1987, designated the Officer in Charge of Regional Special Services (Homicide, Drugs, Fraud) and Intelligence, which included administration of all specialized investigative units of the Peel Regional Police.

The Chief was recognized for his significant contributions and elevated to Superintendent in charge of Communications and Court Services in 1991. His responsibilities included supervision and management of the communication's component of the organization, with respect to the dispatch of police operational units and maintenance of the 911 program.

He was also tasked with the mandate and co-ordination of activities with respect to the following initiatives surrounding the Court Bureau, Summons Bureau, Court Security and Prisoner Escort Bureau on behalf of the Peel Regional Police.

On November 4, 1992, he was promoted to Staff Superintendent, responsible for managing the four operations divisions. In this role, he also assisted in implementing the Peel Regional Police spousal and child abuse protocols, which are uniformly viewed as a model for police services in North America. He served as Staff Superintendent until being appointed Deputy Chief of Police, Operations, on June 21, 1996.

Chief Catney is a renowned proponent of "Community Based Policing" and under his leadership, the service introduced a number of programs - Pure Patrol, Youth Education and Street Crime initiatives. The organization has aggressively enhanced the Community Station, Bike Patrol, School Liaison, and Safety Village initiatives.

Notwithstanding this philosophy, Chief Catney remains dedicated to front-line policing and the expeditious and professional resolution of serious crime.

As a result of Chief Catney's visionary and progressive leadership, the service employed professional development opportunities for command and senior officers internationally. This culminated in the Peel Regional Police service providing leadership and developmental opportunities for senior staff at the F.B.I. Academy in Quantico, Virginia.

The Chief is noted for his deep commitment to the Research and Development process in all areas of policing and has instituted a bureau which now unilaterally examines and analyzes, on a world-wide basis, policing programs and concepts for possible application within the Region of Peel.

The Chief's administration has reflected a sincere commitment to addressing the critical issues of diversity within the Region of Peel and the unique policing challenges they represent. The Chief is committed to a philosophy of maintaining a high profile and visibility within the one hundred and sixteen cultural groups that exist within the Region of Peel and consistently attends numerous social and religious events.

Chief Catney is a member of the International Association of Chiefs of Police, the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police, and the Ontario Association of Chiefs of Police.

Awards and Commendations

A renowned investigator, Chief Catney has been honored twice as "Police Officer of the Year" (1983 and 1984) and was awarded a Police Services Board Commendation for his role in the Barbara Turnbull attempted murder investigation.

He received an official commendation from the Solicitor General of Ontario for his efforts to pro-actively combat organized crime within the Province of Ontario, and is a recipient of the Ontario Medal of Bravery and the Police Exemplary Service Medal.

In October of 1999, Chief Catney was unanimously selected by the Brampton Rotary Club to receive the Paul Harris Award. This award is customarily bestowed on Rotarians for outstanding commitment to the community. He was selected for his involvement with several charities, community groups and for the support he has given the City of Brampton over the years. The Paul Harris Fellowship is a position of respect among Rotarians around the world and is seldom given to non-Rotarians.

In November of 2000, and subsequently in each year since, Chief Catney assumed the role of Community Recruitment Chair for the Juvenile Diabetes Foundation. In this capacity, Chief Catney assists in the identification and recruitment of corporations, individuals and organizations with respect to their participation in the Annual Shoppers Walk for the Cure.

In February of 2002, Chief Catney was elected to a one year term as Chairman of the Governing Body of the Criminal Intelligence Service of Ontario. He was the first Chief in the history of Peel Regional Police to be appointed to this position. In this role, he was responsible for convening meetings with police leaders from across the Province to confront the proliferation of organized crime and other intelligence-related issues.

On May 17, 2002, at Rideau Hall in Ottawa, Chief Catney was among the first to be invested into the Governor General's Order of Merit of the Police Forces. This award recognizes outstanding merit and exceptional service by Canadian police leaders whose contributions extend beyond protection of the community.

On September 10th, 2002, the Kiwanis Club of Brampton chose to honour the Chief with their Mel Osborne Fellowship Award. This award honours one of their founding members and is bestowed on those who have contributed their service and dedication to the community and elsewhere.

On February 17, 2003, Chief Catney was awarded the Queen's Golden Jubilee Medal, created to mark the fiftieth anniversary of Her Majesty's reign as Queen of Canada., and awarded to persons who have made a significant contribution to their fellow citizens, their community or to Canada.

On March 22, 2004, the Human Rights and Race Relations Centre presented Chief Catney with a Gold Medal given to police officers who have played an outstanding role in combating racism.